Antique quilt dating guide

Like, antimony or chrome orange, chrome greens and yellows were popular in the period from about 1860 to 1880 and were produced, often in the home, from highly toxic chemical dye powders. Rich chocolate brown (think the color of a milk chocolate bar, hence the alternate name ‘Hershey’ brown) was often paired with white in quilts.PAAQT members: Our membership application mentions American Quilter’s Society, an Accredited (AM from ASA or ISA) or Certified (CFA; Senior Member from ASA or CAPP from ISA) or a certificate of membership from AAA.Proof of membership and certification must be supplied when first applying.Many antique quilt collectors think of themselves as caretakers of historical documents, made at the hands of the needlework sisterhood before them.

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Although the technique of quilting existed throughout history (quilted items have been discovered in Egyptian tombs, for example, and French knights used quilted jackets under their armor), quilts as we think of them didn't start showing up on the American scene until just prior to 1800.I believe the earliest existing European quilts are a pair of whole cloth trapunto ones, telling the story of Tristan and Isolde dating from the early 1400's.The oldest quilts in the Smithsonian collection go back to about 1780.The first time I went to an all antique quilt auction was in Southern California.One of those large Mid-western quilt dealer auction houses was holding an auction at a nearby hotel and I was very excited to go.In compiling Carrie Hall's Blocks, Havig has made Hall's collection accessible to the modern quilter.Improved before it was even released, this book now has 205 pages showing over 1,000 color swatches to help you recognize, identify and date vintage American fabrics as used in quilts and clothing.The American Quilt : A History of Cloth and Comfort 1750-1950 This re-issued and updated book is a celebration of the quilt which features more than 250 full-color photographs and a text that shows readers how to examine fabrics, dyes, patterns, and other clues in order to place quilts in their social and cultural context.Over 800 Historical Patterns from the College of the Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas. In fact, that segment of the Victorian period is often referred to as “the brown years” because of the prominence of browns in paints and fabrics. Chocolate browns are very indicative of the 1870s and ‘80s.